Noting the Russia threat has not varied much in recent months, Ash blames the higher interest rates on Ukraine’s “uncertainty in terms of the relationship with the IMF and foot dragging.”
Monday, October 29, 2018

Noting the Russia threat has not varied much in recent months, Ash blames the higher interest rates on Ukraine’s “uncertainty in terms of the relationship with the IMF and foot dragging.”

Noting the Russia threat has not varied much in recent months, Ash blames the higher interest rates on Ukraine’s “uncertainty in terms of the relationship with the IMF and foot dragging.” He writes: “The price of stalling gas price hikes has been high, and is now expressed in the large premium demanded by investors for holding Ukrainian Eurobonds, relative to its EM peers. Ukraine’s ratios might be better than Egypt, but Egypt has almost faultlessly held to its IMF program, and benefitted from almost uninterrupted IMF credit disbursements…The lessons of all this, is that Ukrainian politicians need to recognize there are costs associated with their political decisions.”

Previous post
The new, $21 million rail link crosses the Kyiv-Kharkiv highway and delivers passengers to a covered gallery connecting the new rail station, Boryspsil Airport, and Terminal D

The new, $21 million rail link crosses the Kyiv-Kharkiv highway and delivers passengers to a covered gallery connecting the new rail station, Boryspsil Airport, and Terminal D

Next post
ArcelorMittal, the world's largest steel company, plans to invest $1.5 billion in the Kryvvyi Rih mining and steelmaking complex through 2022

ArcelorMittal, the world's largest steel company, plans to invest $1.5 billion in the Kryvvyi Rih mining and steelmaking complex through 2022

Previous Main Topics