Defending the measure,

Serhiy Bykov writes on Facebook: “Current procurement rules close the opportunities for international players to enter the market, which can immediately bring money.” The new, streamlined approach, he said is “the international format of EPC + F contracts” or engineering, procurement, construction + financing. So far, non-binding memorandums have been signed with two foreign construction giants with access to international financing – Bechtel of the US and Poly Changda Engineering Co. of China.

The government hopes to increase foreign investment from $420 million last year, to $3 billion this year, to $15 billion by 2025,

according to the National Economic Strategy 2030 posted last week on the government’s website. Other goals for 2030 are: double the economy; triple exports to $150 billion; nearly triple labor productivity; cut in half the state share in the banking system; cut the debt-to-GDP ratio to 30-40%; and increase the share of small and medium-sized businesses of exports to 40%.

Concorde Capital plans to bring 10 Ukrainian companies to initial public offerings over the next two years,

Concorde CEO Ihor Mazepa said recently at the IPO presentation of Veres Rivne People’s {Football] Club. Citing changes in Ukraine’s financial markets, the Concorde founder said: “What I have seen for the last six or nine months: there has been such a huge trend that a class, a huge group of investors has begun to form in the country. He added: “I give myself, roughly speaking, two years to bring a good 10 companies to an IPO.”

Ukraine plans to attract investment to create “a belt of success” in government-controlled Luhansk and Donetsk,

Oleskiy Reznikov, minister for the Reintegration of the Temporarily Occupied Territories, tells Dom TV Channel. In addition to the multilateral aid flowing into the area, he cited talks with Turkish and Polish companies interested investing in Kyiv-controlled Donbas. Last week, in a nationwide survey of startups by the online database YouControl, Luhansk fared the worst, with only 50 new businesses registered last year, compared to 54,000 across Ukraine.