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Monday, February 24

Global Warming Lengthens Road Construction Season...Turks Win Tender to Finish Zaporizhia Bridge...Russia’s ‘Inspections’ On Azov Cost Shippers $45 million...Kyiv Outshops Moscow...Price of Gas Imports to Drop in Half by Summer...Coal Mines to Close in 2020s
James Brooke
by James Brooke
UBN Morning News is reported and written by James Brooke, a former New York Times foreign correspondent and Bloomberg Moscow Bureau Chief

Thanks to Ukraine’s mild winter, highway workers fired up their bulldozers last week and started work on 34 projects in 14 regions, reports the press service of Ukravtodor. “A record early start was caused by favorable weather conditions,” reports the national highways agency. Working through November, Ukravtodor plans to spend a record $3.5 billion this year to upgrade 4,000 km of national roads and 2,500 km of local roads.

Turkish construction company Onur submitted a winning $488 million bid to complete the long unfinished bridge across the Dnipro at Zaporizhia, Ukravtodor reports on Facebook. The ProZorro tender called for building a 9 km highway with six interchanges and two major bridges — the highway connects Khortytsia island with the right and left banks of the river. The unfinished bridge has been a city landmark since construction first started 16 years ago. The Zelenskiy Administration wants the project completed by the end of 2022.

Turkish construction company Cengiz has signed a memorandum of cooperation to upgrade the M14 road between Mariupol and Nova Kakhkova to the level of an international highway. Planner see upgrading this 350 km east-west route as key to easing the isolation of Berdyansk and Mariupol, Ukraine’s main ports on the Azov.

    Russia has detained 2,249 ships since Kerch Strait naval clash of November 2018, Andriy Klimenko, editor in chief of the BlackSeaNews portal. With each detention for ‘inspections’ lasting an average of four days, shippers have lost $45 million, Klymenko told a European Parliamentary delegation last week in Brussels. He said: “More than half of the ships subjected to unreasonable detentions in the Kerch Strait are related to the EU — having a European flag, shipowner, or port of destination.”

    Confounding stereotypes, the Kyiv metro area has 50% more ‘high quality retail space’ per capita than the Moscow metro area, according to new statistics by UTG, the Ukraine real estate consultancy. Kyiv’s metro population of 3.7 million people has 1.8 million square meters of shopping space, or two people per square meter. Moscow’s metro population of 12.5 million people has 4 million square meters of shopping space, or three people per square meter.

    With Russia’s economy stagnant, the gap may grow.  Without counting 21 Kyiv region malls in ‘concept’ stage, Kyiv is to add 550,000 new square meters – a 30% increase from today’s levels — by the end of next year. This would raise Kyiv’s retail saturation to 1.6 people per square meter, about double Moscow’s.

    In Kyiv, 241,000 square meters of new retail space went on the market last year. This is 50% more than the 159,000 square meters of gross leasable area that went on the market in 2018. With the new supply, Kyiv’s overall retail vacancy rate is creeping up, hitting 7.8% in December. For regional malls, the vacancy rate is twice as high – 15.4%, reports UTG.

    Ukraine’s retail sales are expected to grow by 10% this year, matching last’s growth. Growing three times as fast as GDP growth, retail is fueled by $1 billion a month in remittances from workers outside the country and the large portion of Ukraine’s economy – as much as 50% — that is off the books.

    Supermarket chain Novus plans to open 10 new stores in Kyiv by the end of 2021, Ihor Landa, CEO of BT Invest Ukraine, the company that runs Novus, tells Interfax-Ukraine. He says the chain plans to expand because purchasing power is growing in greater Kyiv, now home to 10% of Ukraine’s population. Novus has 750 unfilled job vacancies.

    For the first time, Ukrainian regional real estate projects will have their own stand at MIPIM, the leading European investment exhibition for the international real estate market. On show will be Ivano-Frankivsk’s Promrylad, a $25 million project to convert a Soviet era factory into modern multiuse space, says Anna Nestuly, Ukraine organizer of Ukraine’s delegation to the March 10-13 fair in Cannes. Counting the Kyiv city stand and the Ukraine regions stand, Ukraine’s delegation is to number 100, double the size of 2018. Participants include: Altis Holding, City One Development, DELTA Ukraine, Dragon Capital, Intergal Bud, Invest in Projects, Mandarin Plaza Group, Midland Development, Toronto-Kyiv, TK Property Management and UDP.

    Ukraine should aim to triple IT workers, to 650,000, and nearly triple IT export revenue, to $13 billion a year, Kira Rudik, a leader of the Rada’s Digital Transformation Committee, said in Zaporizhia. “The IT industry is growing fast,” said Rudik, former CEO of Ring Ukraine, now owned by Amazon.  “We are an agrarian country. We have every chance to become a technological country. What we need to do to achieve this is increase export revenue to $13 billion a year.”

    With talks over the green tariffs adrift for the last six months, Prime Minister Alexei Goncharuk said Friday: “We anticipate serious problems for our energy sector to serve such high obligations…We also do not stand and do not support a retrospective change in the rules.” With investments frozen for many new projects, investors say the government is not showing adequate political will to forge a consensus with industry on tariffs.

    Ukraine’s import price of gas may drop in half this summer – to $80 per 1,000 cubic meters – predicts Oleksiy Orzhel, Energy and Environmental Protection Minister. In January, Ukraine’s average price of imported natural gas was $175.26, already a 10-year low. With production sharing agreements coming up for auction in coming months, Orzhel warns ultra-low prices will turn off investment. He said Friday: “It will be very difficult to make decisions to invest in production…many companies have frozen their further extraction investment projects.”

    The government plans to close most of Ukraine’s coal mines during this decade, Minister Orzhel said Friday at a presentation of a revised draft Concept for a Green Energy Transition To 2050. The cutoff level for production will be $40 a ton. “Very few facilities will be competitive,” Orzhel said, outlining a policy that he predicts will outlast the five-year Zelenskiy Administration. Referring to the social impact, he said: “It will not be shock therapy, but gradual closures.”

    Russian health officials took a Chinese woman with symptoms of a respiratory illness off a Kyiv-Moscow train in Bryansk, Russia. The woman was hospitalized in quarantine. She and five Ukrainian passengers in the rail car later tested negative for coronavirus. The rail car was decoupled from the Ukrzaliznytsia train, sanitized., and isolated.

    From the Editor:  With Ukraine’s new public/private concessions to expand from ports to airports, to railroad stations and to toll highways, foreign investor interest will be high next month at the Ukrainian Transport Infrastructure Forum. The Ukraine Business News is proud to be a media sponsor for Forum which the Strategy Council will hold March 31 at Kyiv’s Premier Palace Hotel. The schedule can be found here. With Best Regards, Jim Brooke jbrooke@ubn.news